Crowns

All-Porcelain Crowns

To restore a damaged smile, all-porcelain crowns can be a beautiful choice. These crowns have the translucency of your natural teeth. This makes them an excellent choice when esthetics are of great importance.


 

Alternatives to a Crown

After a lot of tooth structure has been lost, your choices are limited. You could try a filling. You could have the tooth extracted, or you could choose to put a crown on the tooth.

 

CAD/CAM Restoration Procedure

When your teeth need restoration, we can use CAD/CAM technology to create natural-looking inlays, onlays, crowns, or veneers in just one appointment.

 

Core Buildup Procedure

We use a core buildup to replace the missing portion of a severely broken down tooth, prior to placing a crown. The material we use most commonly is a composite resin that is bonded to the tooth.

 

Crowns after Root Canal Therapy

After a tooth has had root canal treatment, we recommend that a crown be placed on the tooth because the treatment reduces the strength of the tooth.

 

Diagnosing a Cracked Tooth

When a tooth is cracked, it’s often best to protect the tooth by placing a crown. This is especially true for cracks that are located next to fillings because these can easily break, like this tooth.

 

Diagnosing a Failing Filling

When a filling needs to be replaced it’s often best to protect the tooth by switching to a crown.

 

Diagnosing a Large Cavity

When a tooth has a large cavity, the best treatment is often to protect the tooth with a crown instead of placing a filling.

 

Diagnosing Margin Decay

While it’s true that a crown protects and strengthens a tooth, sometimes decay can start at the margin of a crown, where the tooth meets the crown.

 

Did You Know: All-Porcelain Crowns

Did you know that all-porcelain crowns have the appealing look of real teeth?

 

Gold Crown Procedure

When a tooth needs a restoration, sometimes the best choice is a gold crown. It’s precision-crafted in a dental laboratory, so it may take two or more appointments to restore your tooth with a gold crown.

 

Porcelain Crown Procedure

When a tooth needs a restoration, sometimes the best choice is an all-porcelain crown. It’s precision-crafted in a dental laboratory, so it may take two or more appointments to restore your tooth with a porcelain crown.

 

Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Crown Procedure

When a tooth needs a restoration, sometimes the best choice is a porcelain-fused-to-metal crown. A porcelain-fused-to-metal crown, sometimes called a PFM crown, consists of a tooth-colored porcelain layer baked onto a metal core.

 

Post-op Instructions for a Permanent Crown

Now that we’ve placed your permanent crown, it’s important to follow these recommendations to ensure its success. If we used an anesthetic during the procedure, avoid chewing until the numbness has worn off completely.

 

Post-op Instructions for a Temporary Crown

Now that we’ve placed a temporary crown, it’s important to follow these recommendations to ensure the success of your final restoration. If we used an anesthetic during the procedure, avoid chewing until the numbness has worn off completely.

 

Resin Crown Procedure

When a tooth needs a restoration, sometimes the best choice is a resin crown. A resin crown is made of a mixture of plastic resin and microscopic glass-like particles that is cured for strength.

 

Science in Dentistry: What is a Crown?

Today on Science in Dentistry, we’re going to look at crowns. And to illustrate how a crown works, we’ve come to this woodshop.

 

Stainless Steel Crown Procedure

If a baby tooth or a new permanent tooth needs a crown, we have several options. We’ll need to place a crown when decay has destroyed a large part of the tooth structure, or when we have to remove infected pulp from the interior of the tooth. A stainless steel crown is most often used on baby teeth.

 

Technologies in Dentistry: CEREC CAD/CAM

When you need a partial crown, a crown, or even a veneer, you don’t want to wait. The technology is here to make a strong, natural-looking restoration in just one visit.

 

What is Cracked Tooth Syndrome?

Cracked tooth syndrome is a term we use to describe the recurring discomfort, sensitivity, or pain in a tooth, caused by an incomplete fracture or crack.

 

Why a Root Canal After a Crown?

If you have a crown, it was placed because the outside of the tooth was damaged and needed more than just a filling. But the crown doesn’t protect the inside of the tooth, called the pulp. The pulp contains the nerves, blood and veins that keep the tooth alive. If this pulp becomes infected, it will need root canal therapy.

Bad Breath, Bridges, Cavities, Cleanings, Crowns, Dentures, DIAGNOdent, Digital X-Ray, Dry Mouth, Extractions, Failing Fillings, Fillings, Fluoride, Gingivitis, Grinding/Clenching, Hygiene, Implants, Initial Visit, Invisalign, Partial Dentures, Periodontal Disease, Root Canals, Scaling, Sealants, Sensitivity, Soft Tissue Laser, Veneers, Whitening